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Pro-Choice and Pro-Voice

Posts tagged birth control

Jun 24 '14
pro-choice-or-no-voice:

To start off Birth Control Appreciation Day, I decided to make an informative masterpost on contraceptives! I hope this helps anyone who may want more information on their birth control or someone trying to decide what kind of birth control is best for themselves! Happy (birth control) hunting! - Paige
DIFFERENT TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL:
Birth Control Pills - [x] [x]
Mini Pill (Progesterone-only Pill) -  [x]
The Patch (Ortho Evra) - [x] [x]
The Shot (Depo-Provera) - [x] [x]
Birth Control Sponge - [x] [x]
Vaginal Ring (Nuva Ring) - [x] [x]
Spermicide - [x] [x]
Implant (Implanon and Nexplanon) - [x] [x]
IUDs (Mirena, Skyla, and ParaGard) - [x] [x]
Condoms (Male and Female) - [x]
Withdrawal (Pullout Method) - [x] [x]
Diaphragm - [x] [x]
Breastfeeding - [x]
Cervical Cap - [x] [x]
Sterilization (Male and Female) - [x]
Abstinence - [x] [x]
Fertility Awareness-Based Methods (FAMs) - [x] [x]
COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL:
Do certain medications make my birth control less effective?
Can I delay or eliminate my period with my birth control?
Will my pregnancy tests come out with an accurate result while I’m on birth control?
Can I use several birth control pills at once in replace of an emergency contraceptive?
Does birth control cause weight gain?
What should I do if I miss a pill?
What should I do if the condom breaks or slips off inside of me?
If I’m on the ring or the patch and I forget to replace it on the right day, do I need to use backup?
I’ve heard that the birth control ring can pop out. What should I do if this happens?
Can birth control increase my risk of getting cancer?
Can you change your mind after having a tubal ligation or vasectomy?
Is it normal to spot or bleed in between periods while on birth control?
Does certain hormonal birth controls affect my blood pressure?
Can being overweight affect my birth control’s effectiveness?
Can certain birth controls lower my libido?
EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVES:
Types of EC: Plan B / Ella / ParaGard IUD - [x] [x]
What are emergency contraceptives?
How do they work?
How well does it work?
What are the side effects?
When should I take an emergency contraceptive?
Are emergency contraceptives less effective the heavier you are?
If I am under the age of 18 in the US, can I buy emergency contraceptives without my parent’s knowledge or consent?
If I take an emergency contraceptive today, am I covered if I have unprotected sex tomorrow?
Will taking emergency contraceptives too many times affect my fertility?
To find more questions and answers about emergency contraceptives, you can go here.
Información anticonceptivos de emergencia es disponible en Español, aquí.
OPTIONS FOR PEOPLE WITH ALLERGIES AND/OR CERTAIN PREFERENCES:
Condoms for people with latex allergies.
Condoms for vegans. [x] [x] [x]
Other vegan contraceptive options.
Different types of birth control without estrogen.
Contraceptives without any hormones.
Birth control methods that are useful to people with religious concerns. [x] [x]
OTHER BENEFITS OF TAKING BIRTH CONTROL:
Taking oral contraceptives can help lower the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer.
Using birth control helps treat acne.
Birth control can help treat the pain caused by Endomitriosis.
Contraceptives offer relief to people with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS).
Anemia can be avoided/treated by using birth control.
Irregular periods can become more regulated by using birth control.
The pill can lead to fewer ectopic pregnancies.
MYTHS ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL (All the myths below are dispelled through the links given):
Emergency contraceptives and birth control pills cause abortions.
Free contraceptives and/or condoms makes people participate in risky sexual behavior.
The pill makes you gain a lot of weight.
Douching after sex prevents pregnancy.
You have to start your birth control on a Sunday.
Taking the pill for a long time can make you infertile.
Hormonal contraceptives protect you from contracting STIs.
You don’t need to be on birth control while breastfeeding.
I won’t get pregnant my first time having sex.
The Pill is effective immediately after you take it.
I won’t get pregnant if I shower or pee after sex.
My body needs a rest from birth control at least once a year.
Emergency contraceptives are affected by alcohol.

pro-choice-or-no-voice:

To start off Birth Control Appreciation Day, I decided to make an informative masterpost on contraceptives! I hope this helps anyone who may want more information on their birth control or someone trying to decide what kind of birth control is best for themselves! Happy (birth control) hunting! - Paige

DIFFERENT TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL:
  • Birth Control Pills - [x] [x]
  • Mini Pill (Progesterone-only Pill) -  [x]
  • The Patch (Ortho Evra) - [x] [x]
  • The Shot (Depo-Provera) - [x] [x]
  • Birth Control Sponge - [x] [x]
  • Vaginal Ring (Nuva Ring) - [x] [x]
  • Spermicide - [x] [x]
  • Implant (Implanon and Nexplanon) - [x] [x]
  • IUDs (Mirena, Skyla, and ParaGard) - [x] [x]
  • Condoms (Male and Female) - [x]
  • Withdrawal (Pullout Method) - [x] [x]
  • Diaphragm - [x] [x]
  • Breastfeeding - [x]
  • Cervical Cap - [x] [x]
  • Sterilization (Male and Female) - [x]
  • Abstinence - [x] [x]
  • Fertility Awareness-Based Methods (FAMs) - [x] [x]
COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL:
EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVES:
OPTIONS FOR PEOPLE WITH ALLERGIES AND/OR CERTAIN 
PREFERENCES
:
OTHER BENEFITS OF TAKING BIRTH CONTROL:
MYTHS ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL (All the myths below are dispelled 
through the links given):
Jun 24 '14

More on Birth Control!

For information, news, and stories about some of the different methods, you can always check my tags:

#birth control

#contraception

#condom

#emergency contraception and #Plan B

#implant

#iud

#sterilization

#pill

Jun 24 '14

Which Birth Control Method is Best for Me?

Maybe you’re thinking about getting birth control for the first time, or maybe you’re ready for a change. Either way, there are some great resources out there!

To get the most out of your birth control, generally speaking, the more methods you use, the more effective it is. NO, that doesn’t mean using multiple condoms at once! It means using condoms along with the pill, or the IUD along with pulling out, or maybe a diaphragm along with Fertility Awareness-Based Methods (not having sex when you’re most likely to get pregnant). There are tons of methods and combinations, so if one doesn’t work the first time, keep at it!

If you’re not sure where to start, Planned Parenthood and Bedsider have tools to help you decide:

Planned Parenthood: My Method

Bedsider: Method Explorer

Jun 24 '14
Jun 24 '14
May 26 '14
May 24 '14
doctorharleenq:

bebinn:

Have you guys heard of Bedsider? It is my absolute favorite resource for deciding which birth control method to use, and where to find it (sometimes even for free!). They’ll send you a text when it’s time to use your method or get it replaced, too.
If you’ve been wondering what method is right for you, check it out!

So I started exploring this site. Seems pretty oka, but uh…
why are they even suggested withdrawal and tracking as a contraceptive ?

Just like any other birth control method, withdrawal and tracking your menstrual cycle are effective when used correctly - over 90% effective, actually! People whose bodies can’t handle hormones, are allergic to latex and can’t access other types of condoms, can’t afford a method that works for them, etc. can still prevent unwanted pregnancies this way.
Unlike other methods, though, they’re easier to mess up. They require an extensive knowledge of the method and your body, mutual trust, and more vigilance. If you want to use withdrawal or fertility awareness-based methods, it’s more involved than just taking a pill every day or sticking a patch on once a week.
It’s always best to combine multiple methods of birth control: the IUD + withdrawal; the pill + condoms + spermicide; the diaphragm + FAMs, and so on. Less effective methods can still be valuable additions to your birth control toolkit!

doctorharleenq:

bebinn:

Have you guys heard of Bedsider? It is my absolute favorite resource for deciding which birth control method to use, and where to find it (sometimes even for free!). They’ll send you a text when it’s time to use your method or get it replaced, too.

If you’ve been wondering what method is right for you, check it out!

So I started exploring this site. Seems pretty oka, but uh…

why are they even suggested withdrawal and tracking as a contraceptive ?

Just like any other birth control method, withdrawal and tracking your menstrual cycle are effective when used correctly - over 90% effective, actually! People whose bodies can’t handle hormones, are allergic to latex and can’t access other types of condoms, can’t afford a method that works for them, etc. can still prevent unwanted pregnancies this way.

Unlike other methods, though, they’re easier to mess up. They require an extensive knowledge of the method and your body, mutual trust, and more vigilance. If you want to use withdrawal or fertility awareness-based methods, it’s more involved than just taking a pill every day or sticking a patch on once a week.

It’s always best to combine multiple methods of birth control: the IUD + withdrawal; the pill + condoms + spermicide; the diaphragm + FAMs, and so on. Less effective methods can still be valuable additions to your birth control toolkit!

May 22 '14
Have you guys heard of Bedsider? It is my absolute favorite resource for deciding which birth control method to use, and where to find it (sometimes even for free!). They’ll send you a text when it’s time to use your method or get it replaced, too.
If you’ve been wondering what method is right for you, check it out!

Have you guys heard of Bedsider? It is my absolute favorite resource for deciding which birth control method to use, and where to find it (sometimes even for free!). They’ll send you a text when it’s time to use your method or get it replaced, too.

If you’ve been wondering what method is right for you, check it out!

May 10 '14

How effective is the birth control implant? Can you see it in your arm?

plannedparenthood:

image

Someone asked us:

I’m planning on going to college in the fall, and I recently have been talking to my mom about getting started on birth control. I’ve been learning toward the pill, but I know it’s really important to take it everyday and I’m afraid I’d forget every once in a while. I’m curious about methods like the implant that lasts for three years, but I don’t know how effective that is? Also can you see the implant in your arm? It sounds ideal, but I don’t know enough about it!

Good news! The birth control implant (aka Implanon or Nexplanon) is one of the safest and most effective methods of birth control available, and it lasts for three whole years. IUDs are right up there with implants, so they’re another option you might want to consider — both are over 99% effective.

The most common reason birth control fails is because of user error, like forgetting pills, rings or patches. This is why methods like the implant and IUDs are so great – you set ‘em and forget ‘em until they need to be replaced or you want to get pregnant. There’s really no way you can screw them up (unless you don’t get them replaced when you’re supposed to).

And you’re absolutely right that, no matter what method you choose, it’s really important to use it correctly or you’ll be at risk for pregnancy. High-fives for thinking ahead and being honest with yourself about what’s really going to work for you. (And double high-fives to you and your mom for helping to ensure that you’ll be focusing on math tests instead of pregnancy tests in college.)

To answer your next question, the implant is usually invisible, though it can be felt through the skin if someone touches you where the implant is (which is a fun way to give your friends the willies). In rare cases, there may be scarring or discoloring of the skin where the implant is inserted.

The Planned Parenthood Tumblr team is a big fan of IUDs and the implant.  I have a Mirena IUD, Chelsea has a ParaGard IUD, and Amy just got the implant. Reading our stories, checking out the Planned Parenthood website, and using our My Birth Control app can help you decide what’s going to work best for you.

 -Kendall at Planned Parenthood

I wrote about my Nexplanon here! I really like it so far, and I think the one negative side effect, an extended period, is actually sorting itself out. Yay!

May 10 '14

There are pro-lifers who actually think that using birth control or choosing abortion makes you less of a woman

They literally believe that delaying or refusing childbearing destroys your womanhood.

[source]

[source]

[source]

[source]

[source]

[source]

And they call us misogynists.

May 7 '14

plannedparenthood:

So we kinda started a thing.

"I’m Pulling Out" and "Living On A Prayer"

"U Can’t Touch This"

"Where Is The Glove"

"Rhythm Method of the Night"

"Irreversible"

"Sugar, We’re Goin’ Down" (my favorite method)

"I Don’t Want to Be (Pregnant)"

"Soak Up The Sponge"

"Nothing Compares 2 I.U.D."

"Looking for the Perfect Method"

"Only the Good Diaphragm Young"

May 2 '14

http://www.lifemattersoutreach.org/

^ I just now found the website and oh my goodness it’s kinda scary; check out the SELF Control tab - just, no. -_-

——

image

I don’t even know where to start with that website. This is horrible. How can anybody think this is okay?

It would be funny if I didn’t think children and young people were reading these things and believing them. I just want to take all those poor kids by the hand and show them the wonders of Scarleteen and Bedsider and Planned Parenthood. They deserve so much better than this.

Apr 16 '14
octopusice:

gojikas:

Hey fellow JMU students! In case you didn’t already know, the University Health Center has a safer sex center. There are small brown paper bags for you to use to take whatever you need. Everything they have to offer is free, they even have pamphlets and how-to guides. No one will bother you or ask any questions (but they are glad to help if you ask them). :) Please use this awesome resource (or let your friends know it’s available)! 

WHATTTTT
this is so great omg

Aw MAN.

octopusice:

gojikas:

Hey fellow JMU students! In case you didn’t already know, the University Health Center has a safer sex center. There are small brown paper bags for you to use to take whatever you need. Everything they have to offer is free, they even have pamphlets and how-to guides. No one will bother you or ask any questions (but they are glad to help if you ask them). :) Please use this awesome resource (or let your friends know it’s available)! 

WHATTTTT

this is so great omg

Aw MAN.

Apr 9 '14
foryoursexualinformation:

plannedparenthood:

hellyeahscarleteen:

thismighthurt:

SAFER SEX UTILITY BELT TO KEEP YOUR SEX SAFER.

We love this illustration Izzy did for us so much, except for the part that now we all want one of these.  WE WANT IT SO BAD.

Umm yes please! Safer sex <3 

Can I have one of these please? I think I might need to make one :).

Cute! I like that dental dams and rubber gloves are included. I guess internal birth control, like IUDs and implants, probably aren’t so useful on a utility belt. Even if they are the most effective methods!

foryoursexualinformation:

plannedparenthood:

hellyeahscarleteen:

thismighthurt:

SAFER SEX UTILITY BELT TO KEEP YOUR SEX SAFER.

We love this illustration Izzy did for us so much, except for the part that now we all want one of these.  WE WANT IT SO BAD.

Umm yes please! Safer sex <3 

Can I have one of these please? I think I might need to make one :).

Cute! I like that dental dams and rubber gloves are included. I guess internal birth control, like IUDs and implants, probably aren’t so useful on a utility belt. Even if they are the most effective methods!

Apr 2 '14

heavenly-dew asked:

Hi! I saw your post regarding the Nexplanon and I am really considering getting it, but I've read a lot of reviews on it and it seems a wee bit disheartening I'm especially worried about the constant spotting, mood swings, and acne breakouts. I was wondering if you could tell me how it is working for you? Thank you!

My only complaint - and it really is minor - is the extended period. It’s like a real period the first 3-5 days, then spotting for another week. (TMI Alert: I rarely wear underwear because I’m lazy, and the spotting is light enough that I usually don’t need to use any menstrual products either. So, eh.) Plus, my cramps are basically gone, which is awesome for someone who used to spend Day 1 rolling around on their bed and crying. Seriously. Halle-fucking-lujah.

I really, really love that I don’t get mood swings or a dead libido (like when I took the pill), that it was so easy to insert, that it lasts for three years, and that I don’t have to remember anything for it to work. Oh, and the >99% effectiveness. I also appreciate that I can get it taken out at any time if I change my mind.

You’re supposed to give it six months to “settle in,” so I’ll know soon if my cycle will get back to normal, or if I’ll need to weigh the spotting against all the benefits. I’ll probably write another update in a few months.

The implant works differently for everyone. Someone I know can’t use hormonal birth control at all, so it may just take some patience and experimenting. You can check my #implant tag for more on my experience and others’ perspectives!