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Pro-Choice and Pro-Voice

Posts tagged parental consent

Jun 21 '14

What happens during a judicial bypass hearing?

provoice:

The judge will ask you and your attorney questions. You will be asked questions under oath (this means you have to tell the truth). The hearing is usually informal and is kind of like a meeting. The only people in the room will be you and anyone you decide to bring with you, the lawyer, the judge, and possibly a secretary. This is not a trial.

All of this is confidential.

The judge may want to know that you understand the abortion procedure, that you have thought carefully about your decision, and that no one is forcing you to do this. The judge might also want to know about your other responsibilities at home, school, or work, or plans for the future that show your maturity.

The judge will often give their decision right after the hearing, but if they don’t, they still must decide very quickly. The time slot for the decision might vary from state to state, but it’s usually no longer than three business days.

If the judge grants you permission, you will be given something called an “order,” which says you can have the abortion. You must take this with you when you go to the clinic to have your abortion, along with any other forms and identification required by the clinic.

You are always free to change your mind if you decide to not have an abortion. The Order is only there to say that you can have an abortion if you want it.

ProVoice blogged about judicial bypass yesterday, so if you missed it, check out her #judicial bypass tag!

Jul 10 '13

Judicial Bypass for Minors

prolove-prochoice:

[Original post]

What a fantastic resource! Some thoughts from someone who successfully petitioned for a judicial bypass:

- In most cases, the courthouses will be of little resource to you. I believe I called five different courthouses (the circuit courts for the both the county I lived in and the county the abortion clinic was in, the juvenile court for the county I lived in, the intake clerk, and Legal Aid) and NONE of them had any idea what i was talking about. I had to explain what judicial bypass meant, and then it was a series of transfers and holds.

- Go straight to the clinic and ask for their help. They are usually very up-to-date on how the process works and will direct you to the right place.

- Or just go straight to the juvenile court. That’s where I ultimately ended up and the clerk was extremely kind and knowledgable.

- YOU WILL GET A FREE LAWYER FOR THE ENTIRETY OF THIS PROCESS. DO NOT LET ANYONE TELL YOU DIFFERENT. THE COURT WILL ALWAYS ASSIGN YOU A LAWYER FREE OF CHARGE.

- This process is very quick and easy. My JB took place in one of the most conservative counties in arguably the most conservative state in the country, and everyone I came in contact with was kind and non-judgemental. It takes very little time: the first day took about an hour, and the day after I had the actual hearing in the courtroom, which took about fifteen minutes. 

- It really is a very simple process. If anyone has questions I would be more than happy to answer theml

More tips on judicial bypass! How difficult it is to get judicial bypass depends on where you live, but it’s always great to have people you can ask.

Jun 26 '13

Judicial Bypass for Minors

bebinn:

There are 37 states that currently enforce parental notification or consent laws - find out here if yours is one, or call your local Planned Parenthood. To avoid having to notify or obtain consent from parents or guardians, you must get a judicial bypass, meaning a judge will decide if you can get an abortion. Here are a few resources I’ve found on judicial bypass for minors seeking a safe, legal abortion without parental notification or consent.

Getting judicial bypass does not cost anything, and you are entitled to a court-appointed lawyer. You are also entitled to anonymity, and you do not need to give your contact information to anyone you speak with on the phone when getting information about the process.

General Tips

  • The clinic you’ve chosen may be able to help you with the judicial bypass process. Contact them for more information. Find a list of US clinics on the Abortion Assistance Blog.
  • Call the National Abortion Federation’s hotline (1-800-772-9100) for information and referrals in your state.
  • Search your local Planned Parenthood’s website (find it here) for information on judicial bypass in your state. Even if your nearest clinic does not provide abortions, they may have advice on navigating the legal process, and references for someone who can represent you.
  • Contact your state’s American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). They may have a program that provides legal representation, or give referrals to lawyers.
  • If legal in your state, be prepared to go out of your county, or even out of state. Some judges will refuse to handle judicial bypass petitions because of their personal beliefs. If you need help getting to a court that will hear your petition, check out or contact the Abortion Assistance Blog or your state’s abortion fund.

State Information

Alabama

Marla from Birmingham has had experience with judicial bypass in Alabama, and is happy to answer questions about the process.

Alaska

Parental notification in Alaska. Links to forms you have to fill out.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Arizona

Teens and abortion law in Arizona. Links to necessary forms.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Arkansas

Requires parental consent, but no resources found yet. Contact your local clinic, NAF, Planned Parenthood, or ACLU.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Colorado

Instructions and required forms for Colorado.

Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains’ page on judicial bypass.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Delaware

Delaware’s judicial bypass form is called Affidavit and Application for Waiver of Notice of Abortion and is about a fourth of the way down the page.

You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents. This law applies to those under 16.

Florida

Teens Seeking Abortion Services

Legal Guide for Pregnant Teens in Florida (see p. 22, #13)

Georgia

Notification is required, but no resources found yet. Contact your local clinic, NAF, Planned Parenthood, or ACLU.

Idaho

Forms for waiving parental consent can be found on the Court Assistance Office’s website. Instructions can be found on this page (fourth download). Find your district court, where you will go through the process, here.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Indiana

Women’s Med, a group of abortion providers, can help with the process. A doctor can also file on your behalf if they feel your welfare would be in danger if you attempted to get parental consent.

Iowa

Iowa NOW has a Judicial Bypass Fund for minors who obtain judicial bypass, but don’t have the money for an abortion.

You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents. Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Kansas

Aid for Women of Kansas will provide you with a (free) lawyer and the required documents, and help you through the process in Wyandotte County. They can also write your school an excuse for the counseling, sonogram, and abortion dates, if that’s possible for you.

Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri can help with the process.

Kentucky

The Kentucky Health Justice Network works to connect people with reproductive care and services, and may have some advice.

They don’t mention it on their website, but the Kentucky Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice may be able to help with the process, finding a lawyer, etc.

Louisiana

Hope Medical Group for Women will provide you with the necessary forms at the first state-mandated doctor visit.

Maryland

If your doctor/abortion provider believes it is in your best interests, you do not have to notify your parents. This is about the same judgment call as a judge would make, but less trouble for you.

Massachusetts

Judicial bypass in Massachusetts

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Michigan

Information for women under 18: Consent and Abortion. Instructions and frequently answered questions on the process.

The Birds & Bees Project has information on the process and other concerns.

Minnesota

Both parents must be notified, but no resources found yet. Contact your local clinic, NAF, Planned Parenthood, or ACLU.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Mississippi

Both parents must consent, but no resources found yet. Contact the NAF or your state’s ACLU. You can obtain judicial bypass from a chancery judge in your home county or in Hinds county, where the state’s only abortion provider is located.

Missouri

Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri can help with the process.

Montana

This law is scheduled to go into effect later in 2013. Planned Parenthood is currently suing to block it.

Nebraska

Instructions (PDF)

Petition for waiving parental consent (PDF)

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

New Hampshire

The Concord Feminist Health Center’s page on parental notification provides instructions and necessary forms.

Providers have expressed satisfaction with NH’s court staff and judges, saying they were compassionate and sensitive.

North Carolina

Abortion Law in NC for Women under 18. Links to necessary documents and what to expect.

You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents.

North Dakota

Both parents must consent, but no resources found yet. Contact your state’s ACLU or the Red River Women’s Clinic.

Ohio

Lawyer Christine Baker offers free, confidential assistance.

Oklahoma

Details about parental consent and notification.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect. No other resources found yet. Contact the NAF, your state’s ACLU, or the clinic you’ve chosen.

Pennsylvania

The Women’s Law Project in Philadelphia works through the court system to protect reproductive rights and other issues. You can call them for help finding a lawyer.

Judicial Bypass in PA

You can also call CHOICE at 1-800-84-TEENS for information on the process and other questions.

Rhode Island

Consent is required, but no resources found yet. Contact the NAF, your state’s ACLU, Planned Parenthood, or your local clinic.

South Carolina

Text of the bill requires the Adoption and Birth Parent Services Division of the DSS to help you prepare and file the petition if you ask. Call (803) 898-7318 to be connected with them.

This law applies to those younger than 17. If your doctor believes it is in your best interests, you do not have to notify your parents. You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents. Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

South Dakota

Notification is required, but no resources found yet. Contact the NAF, your state’s ACLU, or Planned Parenthood.

Tennessee

Tennessee courts provide a Court Appointed Special Advocate to minors - this includes judicial bypass. More information here.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Texas

Texas Laws and Policies. Links to state-mandated booklet.

Texas has a program called Jane’s Due Process that ensures legal representation for pregnant minors.

Utah

Petition for waiver of parental consent.

Instructions for filing the petition.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Virginia

Pregnant Teen VA, a project of NARAL Pro-Choice Virginia, has step-by-step instructions on the process.

You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents. Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

West Virginia

Notification is required, but no resources found yet. Contact the NAF, your state’s ACLU, or the clinic you’ve chosen.

If your doctor (not associated with the clinic) believes it is in your best interests, you do not have to notify your parents.

Wisconsin

Petition to waive parental consent for abortion (PDF)

If your doctor believes it is in your best interests, you do not have to notify your parents. Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Wyoming

Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains’ page on judicial bypass.

——————-

Many local court staff are ignorant of or hostile to the judicial bypass process. The link to state information is 100% accurate and up-to-date, and if anyone tells you differently, they are wrong. Unfortunately, you may be shuffled around for quite some time until you find someone who knows what they’re talking about.

The judge will base their decision on how “mature” you seem, how important they think it is that you don’t notify your parents, and if abortion is in your best interests. In Florida, for example, these are the criteria:

a) Age.

b) Overall intelligence.

c) Emotional development and stability.

d) Credibility and demeanor as a witness.

e) Ability to accept responsibility.

f) Ability to assess both the immediate and long-range consequences of the minor’s choices.

g) Ability to understand and explain the medical risks of terminating her pregnancy and to apply that to understanding to her decision.

If the judge does not rule within a given time period (usually two or three business days), the petition is either automatically granted, or you have to file yet another petition.

I’ll keep updating this post, so any more information is much appreciated.

Super-updated! Please pass it around!

May 7 '13

Anonymous asked:

Please answer this question for me. Can a 15 year old girl go get an abortion in New Jersey without her parents knowing? Could she pay out of pocket? Would there be a difference between the operation and the pill? What are the laws surrounding this?

Good questions! There are parental notification and consent laws in many states for minors seeking abortion. According to the Guttmacher Institute, which reviews abortion policies and effects in the US and internationally, there is a parental notification law in New Jersey - however, due to a court order, the policy is not in effect. So, there is no enforced law requiring parents to be involved in a minor’s abortion in New Jersey.

There are 24 providers in New Jersey that I know of, so there may be differing policies depending on the clinic. I do know that Planned Parenthood accepts cash, and for the most part will not turn you away due to your inability to pay. They may work out a payment plan, or you can ask if they have a fund.

The difference between surgical abortion and the abortion pill (not to be confused with emergency contraception/Plan B) is explained in these posts: Abortion Procedures. There, you can find descriptions of how the abortion pill works, descriptions of the five/six kinds of surgical abortion, and a comparison of medication abortion vs. surgical abortion.

For more information on abortion laws in the US, the Guttmacher Institute is an amazing resource. Their State Center takes you to specific state policies (look for “State Policies in Brief” once you click on your state), but I’d encourage you to spend some time exploring their site to see what else you can learn!

Nov 3 '12
Aug 21 '12

Judicial Bypass for Minors

There are 38 states that currently enforce parental notification or consent laws - find out here if yours is one, or call your local Planned Parenthood. To avoid having to notify or obtain consent from parents or guardians, you must get a judicial bypass, meaning a judge will decide if you can get an abortion. Here are a few resources I’ve found on judicial bypass for minors seeking a safe, legal abortion without parental notification or consent.

Getting judicial bypass does not cost anything, and you are entitled to a court-appointed lawyer. You are also entitled to anonymity, and you do not need to give your contact information to anyone you speak with on the phone when getting information about the process.

General Tips

  • The clinic you’ve chosen may be able to help you with the judicial bypass process. Contact them for more information. Find a list of US clinics on my Find A Clinic page.
  • Call the National Abortion Federation's hotline (1-800-772-9100) for information and referrals in your state.
  • Search your local Planned Parenthood’s website (find it here) for information on judicial bypass in your state. Even if your nearest clinic does not provide abortions, they may have advice on navigating the legal process, and references for someone who can represent you.
  • Contact your state’s American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). They may have a program that provides legal representation, or give referrals to lawyers.
  • If legal in your state, be prepared to go out of your county, or even out of state. Some judges will refuse to handle judicial bypass petitions because of their personal beliefs. If you need help getting to a court that will hear your petition, check out or contact your state’s abortion fund.

State Information

Alabama

Planned Parenthood Southeast, Inc.’s page on parental consent.

West Alabama Women’s Center Inc.’s page on judicial bypass.

Alaska

Parental notification in Alaska. Links to forms you have to fill out.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Arizona

Teens and abortion law in Arizona. Links to necessary forms.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Arkansas

Little Rock Family Planning Services can help with judicial bypass.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Colorado

Instructions and required forms for Colorado.

Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains’ page on judicial bypass.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Delaware

Delaware’s judicial bypass form is called Affidavit and Application for Waiver of Notice of Abortion and is about a fourth of the way down the page.

You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents. This law applies to those under 16.

Florida

Teens Seeking Abortion Services

Legal Guide for Pregnant Teens in Florida (see p. 22, #13)

Georgia

Atlanta Women’s Medical Center can help you with judicial bypass. There are at least 23 clinics in the state, and the one you choose may also be able to help.

Idaho

Forms for waiving parental consent can be found on the Court Assistance Office’s website. Instructions can be found on this page (fourth download). Find your district court, where you will go through the process, here.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Illinois

Planned Parenthood of Illinois can help with judicial bypass.

The Illinois Judicial Bypass Project has a free network of lawyers that can represent you.

Indiana

Women’s Med, a group of abortion providers, can help with the process. A doctor can also file on your behalf if they feel your welfare would be in danger if you attempted to get parental consent.

Iowa

Iowa NOW has a Judicial Bypass Fund for minors who obtain judicial bypass, but don’t have the money for an abortion.

You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents. Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Kansas

Aid for Women of Kansas will provide you with a (free) lawyer and the required documents, and help you through the process in Wyandotte County. They can also write your school an excuse for the counseling, sonogram, and abortion dates, if that’s possible for you.

Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri can help with the process.

Kentucky

The Kentucky Health Justice Network works to connect people with reproductive care and services, and may have some advice.

They don’t mention it on their website, but the Kentucky Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice may be able to help with the process, finding a lawyer, etc.

Louisiana

Hope Medical Group for Women will provide you with the necessary forms at the first state-mandated doctor visit.

Maryland

If your doctor/abortion provider believes it is in your best interests, you do not have to notify your parents. This is about the same judgment call as a judge would make, but less trouble for you.

Massachusetts

Judicial bypass in Massachusetts

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Michigan

Information for women under 18: Consent and Abortion. Instructions and frequently answered questions on the process.

The Birds & Bees Project has information on the process and other concerns.

Minnesota

Both parents must be notified, but no resources found yet. Contact your local clinic, NAF, Planned Parenthood, or ACLU.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Mississippi

Both parents must consent, but no resources found yet. Contact the NAF or your state’s ACLU. You can obtain judicial bypass from a chancery judge in your home county or in Hinds county, where the state’s only abortion provider is located.

Missouri

Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri can help with the process.

Montana

This law has been temporarily blocked and is not in effect.

Nebraska

Instructions (PDF)

Petition for waiving parental consent (PDF)

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Nevada

This law has been permanently blocked and is not in effect.

New Hampshire

The Concord Feminist Health Center's page on parental notification provides instructions and necessary forms.

Providers have expressed satisfaction with NH’s court staff and judges, saying they were compassionate and sensitive.

New Jersey

This law has been permanently blocked and is not in effect.

New Mexico

This law has been permanently blocked and is not in effect.

North Carolina

Abortion Law in NC for Women under 18. Links to necessary documents and what to expect.

You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents.

North Dakota

Both parents must consent, but no resources found yet. Contact your state’s ACLU or the Red River Women’s Clinic.

Ohio

Lawyer Christine Baker offers free, confidential assistance.

Oklahoma

Details about parental consent and notification.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect. No other resources found yet. Contact the NAF, your state’s ACLU, or the clinic you’ve chosen.

Pennsylvania

The Women’s Law Project in Philadelphia works through the court system to protect reproductive rights and other issues. You can call them for help finding a lawyer.

Judicial Bypass in PA

You can also call CHOICE at 1-800-84-TEENS for information on the process and other questions.

Rhode Island

Consent is required, but no resources found yet. Contact the NAF, your state’s ACLU, Planned Parenthood, or your local clinic.

South Carolina

Text of the bill requires the Adoption and Birth Parent Services Division of the DSS to help you prepare and file the petition if you ask. Call (803) 898-7318 to be connected with them.

This law applies to those younger than 17. If your doctor believes it is in your best interests, you do not have to notify your parents. You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents. Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

South Dakota

Notification is required, but no resources found yet. Contact the NAF, your state’s ACLU, or Planned Parenthood.

Tennessee

Tennessee courts provide a Court Appointed Special Advocate to minors - this includes judicial bypass. More information here.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Texas

Texas Laws and Policies. Links to state-mandated booklet.

Texas has a program called Jane’s Due Process that ensures legal representation for pregnant minors.

Utah

Petition for waiver of parental consent.

Instructions for filing the petition.

Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Virginia

Pregnant Teen VA, a project of NARAL Pro-Choice Virginia, has step-by-step instructions on the process.

You also have the option of telling a grandparent or other adult relative instead of your parents. Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

West Virginia

Notification is required, but no resources found yet. Contact the NAF, your state’s ACLU, or the clinic you’ve chosen.

If your doctor (not associated with the clinic) believes it is in your best interests, you do not have to notify your parents.

Wisconsin

Petition to waive parental consent for abortion (PDF)

If your doctor believes it is in your best interests, you do not have to notify your parents. Exceptions can be made in cases of abuse, assault, incest, or neglect.

Wyoming

Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains’ page on judicial bypass.

——————-

Many local court staff are ignorant of or hostile to the judicial bypass process. The link to state information is 100% accurate and up-to-date, and if anyone tells you differently, they are wrong. Unfortunately, you may be shuffled around for quite some time until you find someone who knows what they’re talking about.

The judge will base their decision on how “mature” you seem, how important they think it is that you don’t notify your parents, and if abortion is in your best interests. In Florida, for example, these are the criteria:

a) Age.

b) Overall intelligence.

c) Emotional development and stability.

d) Credibility and demeanor as a witness.

e) Ability to accept responsibility.

f) Ability to assess both the immediate and long-range consequences of the minor’s choices.

g) Ability to understand and explain the medical risks of terminating her pregnancy and to apply that to understanding to her decision.

If the judge does not rule within a given time period (usually two or three business days), the petition is either automatically granted, or you have to file yet another petition.

I’ll keep updating this post, so any more information is much appreciated.

Aug 21 '12
Aug 21 '12

New issue for the Abortion Assistance Blog

35 states currently enforce parental consent or notification laws for minors seeking abortion. For many, this is dangerous or impossible. If you or someone you know have references to lawyers that will provide free/low-cost services for minors looking to get a judicial bypass, or know of a judge that will hear the proceedings (many conservative judges will not), please message AAB.

Some minors may even have to travel out of state to get a court hearing, and as of now I’m assuming unless otherwise indicated, transportation offers also apply to courthouses.

Apr 1 '12

I volunteered at my city’s reproductive health clinic for a year, and these are the four (most important) things I learned

fuguestasis:

[Content includes descriptions of anti-choice verbal abuse and harassment in #1, as well as domestic/sexual violence in #2]
  1. Clinic “”protesters”” are not exercising their 1st amendment rights. They’re engaging in emotional terrorism, slander, and harassment. Their goal is to inflict damage. Clinic employees, interns, and volunteers who are harassed sometimes daily should be able to take out restraining orders against them. They should be able to take out restraining orders on whole organizations, ideally, as well as individuals. Massachusetts is lucky enough to have a sort of legally-mandated “buffer zone;” protesters need to stay a certain number of feet away from the clinic’s door, but they get up in your face as you walk down the street and they are more than happy to yell to you right up until you make it inside.
  2. “Parental notification” or “parental consent” laws are bullshit. Nobody under the age of 18 gets an abortion without telling their parent(s) unless there is a damn fucking good reason. Minors with abusive parents who might withhold medical treatment as “leverage,” minors who were actually knocked-up by their legal guardian in the first place, minors who aren’t in contact with their parents (and who have reason to fear violence or abuse if they DO get back in touch), and minors with anti-choice parents who would medically/reproductively abuse their child by forcing them to carry a pregnancy to term—all of these people are the ones who get hurt by these laws. The white, middle-class, kindly, heterosexual, cis parents with the wayward daughter who runs off and gets an abortion before her parents have a chance to tell her about her options? The ones lawmakers are constantly referencing when they pass these kinds of bills?? The ones who “have the right to know”??? They know. If they have shown themselves to be safe people, their kid will come to them. Few people make this decision lightly. Very few people will actually pass up the chance to be supported in this by the non-abusive people in their lives (especially their fucking parents).
  3. Many reproductive-health-focused organization contribute directly to trans healthcare disparities. I volunteered at the clinic for a year. I had to sign each patient in individually, and I would talk with them before they got called in my a doctor or nurse. I never saw one person who didn’t at least pass as cis (including “passing” as cis on paper, too). There probably were individual cis-passing trans people who came, who were misgendered, and who did not receive the full scope of treatment/education/respect that their cis counterparts did. But trans people—men, women, and people who are both/neither—are disproportionately under-represented and under-served at the expense of our health as a community.
  4. Abortion is not our only fight. Abortion access is so, so important. But the vast majority of reproductive health organizations/clinics recognize that prevention, education, and empowerment are vital. Abortion is not its own isolated example of a single privilege/oppression dichotomy. Instead, it’s one crucial piece of an over-arching, multi-focused conversation about sexual and domestic violence, misogyny, sexual health, trans rights, youth and childrens’ rights, white supremacy, ableism, nationalism, and capitalism. Losing this focus obscures the broader picture and pushes aside very goals we should ultimately be working in service of.

(Source: poorlifechoicesblog)