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Pro-Choice and Pro-Voice

Posts tagged post abortion stress syndrome

Mar 5 '14
"Women felt more regret, sadness and anger about the pregnancy than about the abortion."

Rocca et al. (2013). Women’s Emotions One Week After Receiving or Being Denied an Abortion in the United States. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 45(3), 122-31.

Experiencing complex, even negative emotions after an abortion does not mean a patient feels they made the wrong decision. Post-abortion emotions vary from patient to patient, and from abortion to abortion, depending on life circumstances, social support, and the difficulty they had making a decision. Forcing all patients to undergo mandatory ultrasounds or biased counseling does not address these issues, and may even make the negative emotions worse.

This study also found that, in one of the groups, most of the women who felt regret also felt relief. Most of the women who felt regret also felt the abortion was still the right decision. Focusing on one or two individual emotions denies the reality that we all live - we all experience multiple, often conflicting emotions at any given time.

If anyone would like the full PDF of the study, send me your email address and I can get it to you. Students can also access it through their library account.

Feb 28 '14

lovemaniak:

bebinn:

The United States has a pro-life problem. Every day, clinics across the country are besieged by protestors, causing emotional distress to patients and threatening the safety and privacy of patients and clinic staff. Protestors hold gory, photoshopped or mislabeled posters, shout obscenities, pray and sing loudly, stalk patients and staff, and condemn passersby to hell for…walking past, I guess. Some students even get school credit for protesting.

One of the more egregious types of protestors is the “sidewalk counselor,” who, despite having no professional or medical training to claim the title, follows patients up and down the sidewalk, pleading with them not to enter the clinic (and perhaps instead, to visit one of their fake clinics).

At least eight abortion clinic employees have been murdered by anti-abortion extremists since the early 1990’s. Other acts of terrorism include multiple cases of attempted murder, arson, bombings, anthrax threats, stalking, death threats, and vandalism. These extremists usually participated in clinic protests before their attacks, or were associated with anti-abortion groups.

  1. Helpers of God’s Precious Infants protesting outside a clinic in New York City (via @Tracie713)
  2. Protestors outside a clinic in Englewood, New York. Clinic escorts are in neon vests (via Merle Hoffman)
  3. Rain won’t keep away the protestors outside Louisville, Kentucky’s only abortion clinic (via Every Saturday Morning)
  4. A ring of protestors surrounds the buffer zone outside the Coastal Birth Control Center in Corpus Christi, Texas (via USNews)
  5. Catholic schoolchildren pray outside Women’s Med Center in Sharonville, Ohio (via The Catholic Telegraph)
  6. Over 200 students from Virginia’s Christendom College swarm a Planned Parenthood in Washington, D.C. (via LifeSiteNews)

It should be pointed out that these are EXTREME protestors. Not everyone is like this! I myself attended a protest while at a catholic high school and it was nothing but peaceful on our part. We remained on the sidewalk on the opposite sidewalk of the clinic, kneeled, and said the entirety of the rosary. Why did we do this? We dont do it to emotionally traumatize the patient, though we have been succesful in some of them choosing to seek help through the church rather than aborting the child and putting THEMSELVES through the emotional trauma of killing their child. We are there to prevent the trauma, not to cause it. As peaceful protestors like the school children displayed above we are taught to only pray for the patient and the aborted child, not to directly intervene with free will. This should be strongly noted, and as i am no longer catholic or attending a catholic school, i am not bias in saying not all protests are like the ones explained above. Hopefully one day women will realize that the church and protests are there to help them avoid a procedure that is proven to cause immense emotional trauma, and give a child their right to live whether it be with the birth mother or not.

I don’t know why I keep reading these kinds of responses to my clinic harassment posts, I really don’t.

Just for you, lovemaniak:

Abortion is NOT a danger to mental health (more on my #post abortion stress syndrome tag)

Why your concern for the pro-life image is selfish and misguided

Praying crowds are still intimidating and shaming

Patients’ experiences with protestors

Hopefully that gives you a little insight.

Feb 28 '14
Feb 19 '14

Fumbled citations!

I’ve fixed it now, but the post I made rebutting falsehoods about Planned Parenthood has a bad link. The American Psychiatric Association used to have a page on abortion and mental health, which has disappeared, and I accidentally linked to the American Psychological Association twice. Both of these organizations have refuted the existence of post-abortion stress syndrome, a disorder manufactured by the pro-life movement to bolster their claims that abortion is dangerous to mental health.

The American Psychiatric Association is in charge of writing the DSM, or the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is the universal classification and diagnostic tool for psychiatrists. The updated version, DSM-V, was published in 2013. Until they get their page up again, just know that PASS is not and has never been included in the DSMs I through V. While emotions vary after abortion, and many do feel guilt, regret, anger, or sadness (all of which are valid and deserving of care and attention), without its inclusion in the DSM-V, PASS is not a legitimate diagnosis.

Feb 16 '14
p-a-r-a—d-o-x:

Alright , so here’s the thing. Hell yeah , I’m pro choice , but does that mean I’m gonna be all for abortions ? Hell no. They’re horrible. They’re horrible because of the way they’re done. Also , most of the time , after a woman gets an abortion , she has to go through sometimes years or therapy sometimes for the rest of her life. It haunts her for the rest of her life. The only reason I am pro choice is because I’m not about telling people how to live their life. But just because someone is pro life doesn’t mean they’re going to blow everyone up. Or shoot people. So how about we stop assuming everyone that doesn’t have the same opinion as you is trying to kill people.

Your statement about mental health after abortion is wrong. The American Psychological Association concluded that abortion does not cause mental harm. Studies showing otherwise have been debunked, 90% of patients feel relief, and even in patients who feel negative emotions after their abortion, 80% said it was the right choice.
Regardless, some people do feel negative or conflicting emotions, and there are four pro-choice/pro-voice hotlines in the U.S. they can call if they need to talk. If you want to read stories from real people who had abortions, check out my Abortion Experiences page.
I’m not even going to address the absurdity that is insisting people let down their guard and stop being so mean to an historically violent, misogynistic movement. This isn’t about differing opinions, this is about dignity and survival.

p-a-r-a—d-o-x:

Alright , so here’s the thing. Hell yeah , I’m pro choice , but does that mean I’m gonna be all for abortions ? Hell no. They’re horrible. They’re horrible because of the way they’re done. Also , most of the time , after a woman gets an abortion , she has to go through sometimes years or therapy sometimes for the rest of her life. It haunts her for the rest of her life. The only reason I am pro choice is because I’m not about telling people how to live their life. But just because someone is pro life doesn’t mean they’re going to blow everyone up. Or shoot people. So how about we stop assuming everyone that doesn’t have the same opinion as you is trying to kill people.

Your statement about mental health after abortion is wrong. The American Psychological Association concluded that abortion does not cause mental harm. Studies showing otherwise have been debunked, 90% of patients feel relief, and even in patients who feel negative emotions after their abortion, 80% said it was the right choice.

Regardless, some people do feel negative or conflicting emotions, and there are four pro-choice/pro-voice hotlines in the U.S. they can call if they need to talk. If you want to read stories from real people who had abortions, check out my Abortion Experiences page.

I’m not even going to address the absurdity that is insisting people let down their guard and stop being so mean to an historically violent, misogynistic movement. This isn’t about differing opinions, this is about dignity and survival.

Aug 7 '13
Jun 4 '13
zeonhime:

[deleted for brevity: Bébinn]
There is only one thing I disagree about in this post, and that is PASS, or post abortion stress syndrome. While the community doesn’t want to recognize it as a real thing, as someone who has had an abortion and suffered through it as well as aided other women as they struggled the same exact stages as I did, I am here to tell you that it is very real and it effects more women than people would like to think. Not every woman walks away from an abortion guilt free and not every woman has no needed after care for mental health related issues. If you do research you will find that there is a surprisingly large number of women who have had severe break downs and there are many support groups out there for women who struggle with PASS, and these groups do not label as either pro-life or pro-health. It is also not a “you read it and think you have it”, I had no idea PASS existed until I was many months into the most severe depression of my life. Discovering PASS existed and that I wasn’t alone was what saved my life. So please do not discount it as something that isn’t real: you are taking away from women who do suffer it and who feel completely alone.

Thank you for writing this, and I’m sorry this came off as if I were implying that nobody feels sad, guilty, or regretful after getting an abortion. That is absolutely not true - there is a wide range of abortion experiences and they are all valid. If an abortion experience or the circumstances surrounding it are traumatic (for example, indecision, abuse, desire to continue a pregnancy but no resources to do so, poor treatment by medical staff, etc.), then symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression can certainly arise. There are many support groups and hotlines for people who need them after an abortion, and I’ve made a list of hotlines you can find on the Abortion Assistance Blog.
What I was saying is that post-abortion stress syndrome is not recognized by either the American Psychiatric Association, nor the American Psychological Association. PA[S]S is a term created by Vincent Rue, an anti-choice advocate, and its statistics have been manipulated and greatly inflated by anti-choice think tanks in order to push an anti-abortion agenda. Valid research does not support a generalized link between abortion and mental illness. Instead, what’s most commonly found is that the people who suffer emotionally and mentally after an abortion have experiences I listed in the above paragraph, as well as/or a previous history of depression, anxiety, etc. This article in the New York Times, “Is There a Post-Abortion Syndrome?" explains most of that.
Again, I’m very sorry I didn’t make that point clear. While the majority of people feel relief after an abortion, there are plenty who don’t, and it’s incredibly important to support them.

zeonhime:

[deleted for brevity: Bébinn]

There is only one thing I disagree about in this post, and that is PASS, or post abortion stress syndrome. While the community doesn’t want to recognize it as a real thing, as someone who has had an abortion and suffered through it as well as aided other women as they struggled the same exact stages as I did, I am here to tell you that it is very real and it effects more women than people would like to think. Not every woman walks away from an abortion guilt free and not every woman has no needed after care for mental health related issues. If you do research you will find that there is a surprisingly large number of women who have had severe break downs and there are many support groups out there for women who struggle with PASS, and these groups do not label as either pro-life or pro-health. It is also not a “you read it and think you have it”, I had no idea PASS existed until I was many months into the most severe depression of my life. Discovering PASS existed and that I wasn’t alone was what saved my life. So please do not discount it as something that isn’t real: you are taking away from women who do suffer it and who feel completely alone.

Thank you for writing this, and I’m sorry this came off as if I were implying that nobody feels sad, guilty, or regretful after getting an abortion. That is absolutely not true - there is a wide range of abortion experiences and they are all valid. If an abortion experience or the circumstances surrounding it are traumatic (for example, indecision, abuse, desire to continue a pregnancy but no resources to do so, poor treatment by medical staff, etc.), then symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression can certainly arise. There are many support groups and hotlines for people who need them after an abortion, and I’ve made a list of hotlines you can find on the Abortion Assistance Blog.

What I was saying is that post-abortion stress syndrome is not recognized by either the American Psychiatric Association, nor the American Psychological Association. PA[S]S is a term created by Vincent Rue, an anti-choice advocate, and its statistics have been manipulated and greatly inflated by anti-choice think tanks in order to push an anti-abortion agenda. Valid research does not support a generalized link between abortion and mental illness. Instead, what’s most commonly found is that the people who suffer emotionally and mentally after an abortion have experiences I listed in the above paragraph, as well as/or a previous history of depression, anxiety, etc. This article in the New York Times, “Is There a Post-Abortion Syndrome?" explains most of that.

Again, I’m very sorry I didn’t make that point clear. While the majority of people feel relief after an abortion, there are plenty who don’t, and it’s incredibly important to support them.

(Source: bebinn)

Jul 25 '12
Jul 21 '12

FACTS

god-is-prochoice:

prolife4life:

A survey of post-abortive women found that:

28% attempted suicide

31% experienced suicidal feelings

60% commented that the decision to abort made their lives worse

94% regretted the decision to abort
“Survey of Reaction to Abortion,” The Post Abortion Review, Fall 1994, pp. 6-8.

Oh, would you look at that? Seems like only biased, non-peer-reviewed pro-life websites seem to cite this bullshit. Too bad I already linked you to actual statistics that prove this wrong.

Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.

Let’s see, what else:

  1. The study is 13 years old.
  2. The journal is published by the Elliot Institute, which has a clearly stated anti-abortion stance.
  3. The creator of the Elliot Institute, David Reardon, has a Ph.D. from an unaccredited university and is well-known for misrepresenting his credentials. Also, the NYT called him the Moses of anti-abortion activists.

I can see how full of shit the “study” would be without even looking at it. Next time you want to play the game, you may want to learn the rules and why these kinds of studies are, more often than not, completely invalid.

Apr 16 '12

I’m currently putting together a six page paper of the negative psychological effects that often walk hand-in-hand with abortion.

allarecreatedequal:

katherinetheliberal:

allarecreatedequal:

The finished project shall be uploaded on Wednesday—get excited. 

Look  at  the  APA  disproving  you.

Can  you  send  me  your  sources.  You  have  to  make  sure they  aren’t  biased.

Also,  Postpartum  Depression  is  worth  throwing  in  the  stew.  Look  at  what  can  happen  if  you  give  birth.

Yeah, like I said, it’s not always. It’s just often. I’m just gonna copy a bunch of stuff from my bibliography. Can’t promise that some of it won’t be pro-life. For the most part, though, the’re unbiased. Also, this is a working bibliography. Forgive my mistakes in format. 

Read More

Ack, Priscilla Coleman and David Reardon are no-no’s. They’ve made their anti-abortion bias very clear, and their methodology has been repeatedly criticized by other scientists. Bias has no place in research, and if you want the paper to be taken seriously, you’ll probably want to throw those studies out. Then again, if you’re just writing the paper to please pro-lifers, use as much bad science as you want! They love that stuff!

Also, it’s generally considered good practice to use studies from within the past 10 years, to be sure the findings are up to date.

I don’t know what “often” means to you, so there’s no real way to address that (not that anyone’s asking me to). The reality is that the majority of people who get abortions don’t experience negative effects unless they had problems before the abortion.

You can check the #depression, #post abortion stress syndrome, and #science tags on this blog if you want other articles or information on finding and analyzing them.

Mar 5 '12
Jan 22 '12

Debunking Abortion Myths, in Honor of Roe

ohfortheloveofsagan:

ARTICLE FOUND HERE

This post was originally written on January 21, 2011 to commemorate the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision to legalize abortion in the United States. To honor Roe, and to honor the groups, practitioners, nurses, staff, and volunteers who have dedicated their lives to providing reproductive health care, we’re debunking some common abortion myths.

 ABORTION MYTHS:

  1.  Emergency Contraception (EC) is an abortifacient.  Despite what Nick Cannon said recently, emergency contraception does not cause an abortion. EC prevents pregnancy, while the abortion pill (mifepristone) terminates an existing pregnancy. Check out NARAL’s great fact sheet for more info.
  2. Women use abortion as a form of birth control – Actually, 54 percent of women who have abortions had used a contraceptive method (usually the condom or the pill) during the month they became pregnant. Birth control methods fail, and inconsistent contraceptive use, as well as life changes, contribute to unplanned pregnancy. There is no research that states that women depend on or use abortion as a method of birth control.
  3. Abortion causes post-traumatic stress and other mental health disorders. A 2008 report by the APA Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion concluded, “the best scientific evidence indicates that the relative risk of mental health problems among adult women who have an unplanned pregnancy is no greater if they have an elective first-trimester abortion than if they deliver the pregnancy.”  This is also made clear through the fact that “postabortion traumatic stress syndrome” is not recognized by either the American Psychological Association (APA) or the American Psychiatric Association.
  4. Women who have abortions will never be mothers. There’s a big misconception out there about who has abortions. Many believe there are two types of women in this world—those who have abortions and those who have children. The fact is 61% of women who have abortions already have one or more children.           
      
     
  5. Abortion causes breast cancer. In 1997, the New England Journal of Medicine published the largest-scale study ever on this subject–with 1.5 million participants–which concluded that there is no independent link between abortion and breast cancer.
  6. Making abortion illegal will stop women from having them. Abortion was prevalent in the United States long before the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade. Because it was an illegal procedure, women who needed abortions had no choice but to obtain them from illegal practitioners. The “back-alley” abortion was dangerous and is listed as the official cause of death for almost 2,700 women in 1930.
  7. Pro-choice means pro-abortion. People who are pro-choice believe in the right for a woman to choose what happens to her body—whether that be an abortion, adoption, or carrying the pregnancy full-term. Being pro-choice means a lot of things and women and men who are pro-choice believe in choice for many reasons.
  8. All Planned Parenthood does is abortions. As long as there is a need for abortion services, Planned Parenthood will continue to provide those services for women. We work diligently to decrease the need for abortions by providing access to family planning services, comprehensive sexuality education, programs that promote communication and good decision making skills, and strong advocacy on policy decisions that protects all of the above.
  9. Women who have abortions can’t get pregnant, or will have a harder time conceiving.  Abortions performed in the first trimester pose virtually no long-term risk of such problems as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, congenital malformation, or preterm or low-birth-weight delivery. Most women have abortions in their first trimester.
  10. Women having abortions are young, irresponsible women who can’t be bothered to take birth control.  Women of all ages have abortions for many reasons including financial, ability to provide care, the health of the fetus, the health of the pregnant woman, the lack of a co-parent, and many other legitimate reasons. Women of all reproductive ages have abortions – it has nothing to do with age or responsibility.
Dec 22 '11

Dear Anti-choicers; The only possible psychological effects my abortion may have had on me is my desire to want to punch you all in the face and light you on fire because you’re such assholes.

aliberatedimpulse:

stfuhypocrisy:

nikosnature:

stfuhypocrisy:

nikosnature:

http://afterabortion.org/2011/abortion-risks-a-list-of-major-psychological-complications-related-to-abortion/

And all these ones too. 

I’m sorry, you’re actually expecting me to believe this anti-choice bullshit website is a legitimate source of information with regards to abortion?

Maybe that would be too much to ask.  But would you also similarly discredit the 23 sources it cites?  If so, why?

1. An excellent resource is Thomas Strahan’s Detrimental Effects of Abortion: An Annotated Bibliography with Commentary (Third Edition) This resource includes brief summaries of major finding drawn from medical and psychology journal articles, books, and related materials, divided into major categories of relevant injuries.  An online version can be found at AbortionRisks.org

2. Ashton,”They Psychosocial Outcome of Induced Abortion”, British Journal of Ob&Gyn., 87:1115-1122, (1980).

3. Badgley, et.al.,Report of the Committee on the Operation of the Abortion Law (Ottawa:Supply and Services, 1977)pp.313-321.

4. R. Somers, “Risk of Admission to Psychiatric Institutions Among Danish Women who Experienced Induced Abortion: An Analysis on National Record Linkage,” Dissertation Abstracts International, Public Health 2621-B, Order No. 7926066 (1979); H. David, et al., “Postpartum and Postabortion Psychotic Reactions,” Family Planning Perspectives 13:88-91 (1981).

5. Kent, et al., “Bereavement in Post-Abortive Women: A Clinical Report”, World Journal of Psychosynthesis (Autumn-Winter 1981), vol.13,nos.3-4.

6. Catherine Barnard, The Long-Term Psychological Effects of Abortion, Portsmouth, N.H.: Institute for Pregnancy Loss, 1990).

7. Herman, Trauma and Recovery, (New York: Basic Books, 1992) 34.

8. Francke, The Ambivalence of Abortion (New York: Random House, 1978) 84-95.

9. Zakus, “Adolescent Abortion Option,” Social Work in Health Care, 12(4):87 (1987); Makhorn, “Sexual Assault & Pregnancy,” New Perspectives on Human Abortion, Mall & Watts, eds., (Washington, D.C.: University Publications of America, 1981).

10. Adler, “Sample Attrition in Studies of Psycho-social Sequelae of Abortion: How great a problem.” Journal of Social Issues, 1979, 35, 100-110.

11. Speckhard, “Postabortion Syndrome: An Emerging Public Health Concern,” Journal of Social Issues, 48(3):95-119.

12. Speckhard, Psycho-social Stress Following Abortion, Sheed & Ward, Kansas City: MO, 1987; and Belsey, et al., “Predictive Factors in Emotional Response to Abortion: King’s Termination Study – IV,” Soc. Sci. & Med., 11:71-82 (1977).

13. Speckhard, Psycho-social Stress Following Abortion, Sheed & Ward, Kansas City: MO, 1987; Gissler, Hemminki & Lonnqvist, “Suicides after pregnancy in Finland, 1987-94: register linkage study,” British Journal of Medicine 313:1431-4, 1996.C. Haignere, et al., “HIV/AIDS Prevention and Multiple Risk Behaviors of Gay Male and Runaway Adolescents,” Sixth International Conference on AIDS: San Francisco, June 1990; N. Campbell, et al., “Abortion in Adolescence,” Adolescence, 23(92):813-823 (1988); H. Vaughan, Canonical Variates of Post-Abortion Syndrome, Portsmouth, NH: Institute for Pregnancy Loss, 1991; B. Garfinkel, “Stress, Depression and Suicide: A Study of Adolescents in Minnesota,” Responding to High Risk Youth, Minnesota Extension Service, University of Minnesota (1986).

14. Harlap, “Characteristics of Pregnant Women Reporting Previous Induced Abortions,” Bulletin World Health Organization, 52:149 (1975); N. Meirik, “Outcome of First Delivery After 2nd Trimester Two Stage Induced Abortion: A Controlled Cohort Study,” Acta Obsetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavia 63(1):45-50(1984); Levin, et al., “Association of Induced Abortion with Subsequent Pregnancy Loss,” JAMA, 243:2495-2499, June 27, 1980.

15. Obel, “Pregnancy Complications Following Legally Induced Abortion: An Analysis of the Population with Special Reference to Prematurity,” Danish Medical Bulletin, 26:192- 199 (1979); Martin, “An Overview: Maternal Nicotine and Caffeine Consumption and Offspring Outcome,” Neurobehavioral Toxicology and Tertology, 4(4):421-427, (1982).

16. Klassen, “Sexual Experience and Drinking Among Women in a U.S. National Survey,” Archives of Sexual Behavior, 15(5):363-39 ; M. Plant, Women, Drinking and Pregnancy, Tavistock Pub, London (1985); Kuzma & Kissinger, “Patterns of Alcohol and Cigarette Use in Pregnancy,” Neurobehavioral Toxicology and Terotology, 3:211-221 (1981).

17. Morrissey, et al., “Stressful Life Events and Alcohol Problems Among Women Seen at a Detoxification Center,” Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 39(9):1159 (1978).

18. Oro, et al., “Perinatal Cocaine and Methamphetamine Exposure Maternal and Neo-Natal Correlates,” J. Pediatrics, 111:571- 578 (1978); D.A. Frank, et al., “Cocaine Use During Pregnancy Prevalence and Correlates,” Pediatrics, 82(6):888 (1988); H. Amaro, et al., “Drug Use Among Adolescent Mothers: Profile of Risk,” Pediatrics 84:144-150, (1989)

19. Speckhard, Psycho-social Stress Following Abortion, Sheed & Ward, Kansas City: MO, 1987; J. Spaulding, et al, “Psychoses Following Therapeutic Abortion, Am. J. of Psychiatry 125(3):364 (1978); R.K. McAll, et al., “Ritual Mourning in Anorexia Nervosa,” The Lancet, August 16, 1980, p. 368.

20. Benedict, et al., “Maternal Perinatal Risk Factors and Child Abuse,” Child Abuse and Neglect, 9:217-224 (1985); P.G. Ney, “Relationship between Abortion and Child Abuse,” Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 24:610-620, 1979; Reardon, Aborted Women – Silent No More (Chicago: Loyola University Press, 1987), 129-30, describes a case of woman who beat her three year old son to death shortly after an abortion which triggered a “psychotic episode” of grief, guilt, and misplaced anger.

21. Shepard, et al., “Contraceptive Practice and Repeat Induced Abortion: An Epidemiological Investigation,” J. Biosocial Science, 11:289-302 (1979); M. Bracken, “First and Repeated Abortions: A Study of Decision-Making and Delay,” J. Biosocial Science, 7:473-491 (1975); S. Henshaw, “The Characteristics and Prior Contraceptive Use of U.S. Abortion Patients,” Family Planning Perspectives, 20(4):158-168 (1988); D. Sherman, et al., “The Abortion Experience in Private Practice,” Women and Loss: Psychobiological Perspectives, ed. W.F. Finn, et al., (New York: Praeger Publ. 1985), pp98-107; E.M. Belsey, et al., “Predictive Factors in Emotional Response to Abortion: King’s Termination Study – IV,” Social Science and Medicine, 11:71- 82 (1977); E. Freeman, et al., “Emotional Distress Patterns Among Women Having First or Repeat Abortions,” Obstetrics and Gynecology, 55(5):630-636 (1980); C. Berger, et al., “Repeat Abortion: Is it a Problem?” Family Planning Perspectives 16(2):70-75 (1984).

22. Joyce, “The Social and Economic Correlates of Pregnancy Resolution Among Adolescents in New York by Race and Ethnicity: A Multivariate Analysis,” Am. J. of Public Health, 78(6):626-631 (1988); C. Tietze, “Repeat Abortions – Why More?” Family Planning Perspectives 10(5):286-288, (1978).

23. Leach, “The Repeat Abortion Patient,” Family Planning Perspectives, 9(1):37-39 (1977); S. Fischer, “Reflection on Repeated Abortions: The meanings and motivations,” Journal of Social Work Practice 2(2):70-87 (1986); B. Howe, et al., “Repeat Abortion, Blaming the Victims,” Am. J. of Public Health, 69(12):1242-1246, (1979).

Uhhh I hate to burst your bubble, (not really) but the most recent source you cited, is at least 22 years old, with the vast majority being at least 30 years old. Your information is outdated to say the least. Even still, let’s say that info is still relevant today, (which it’s not) it’s still ultimately her decision.

Let me refer you to some legitimate sources, like, oh I don’t know, the American Psychology Association http://www.apa.org/topics/abortion/index.aspx

“In North America… there is a pronounced bias against reporting bad news about induced abortion.” - Ian Gentles

“Results Women who had undergone an abortion experienced an 81% increased risk of mental health problems, and nearly 10% of the incidence of mental health problems was shown to be attributable to abortion. The strongest subgroup estimates of increased risk occurred when abortion was compared with term pregnancy and when the outcomes pertained to substance use and suicidal behaviour.” - Priscilla Coleman in a study from 1995 to 2009, which also challenges the APA bias-based study

Or how about The American Cancer society:

http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/BreastCancer/MoreInformation/is-abortion-linked-to-breast-cancer

” At this time, the scientific evidence does not support the notion that abortion of any kind raises the risk of breast cancer or any other type of cancer”


Now, did you really think you were bursting bubbles? Nope. It seems you pro-choicers tirelessly find any source or article that fits convenience.

“In analyses of all 897 breast cancer cases (subtypes combined), the multivariate-adjusted odds ratios for examined risk factors were consistent with the effects observed in previous studies on younger women (Table 1 ). Specifically, older age, family history of breast cancer, earlier menarche age, induced abortion, and oral contraceptive use were associated with an increased risk for breast cancer.” - Risk Factors for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

First, let’s go the site’s source— the site you noted.

National Cancer Institute. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk. Accessed at www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/abortion-miscarriage on September 2, 2011.

Interesting. The chief organizer of this workshop is the same in the above research paper. See the lie?

So much for outdated sources, eh?

I should probably throw this in too:

http://www.rhrealitycheck.org/article/2011/12/16/study-having-an-abortion-does-not-increase-risk-mental-health-problems-unwanted-p

We should just forget about that research and stuff and refer to outdated sources and an antichoice dude on tumblr for our information.


And should I throw in this:

http://www.bcpinstitute.org/physiology.htm

How bullshit are those studies? Let me count the ways.

I’ve already done a bit on why Priscilla Coleman is a bad scientist who puts out bad studies, but just to review:

Priscilla Coleman is an undoubtedly biased “scientist” who regularly speaks at pro-life events and has been repeatedly criticized for her outrageously bad methodology. [PBS interview] […]

Unfortunately for Coleman, other scientists have not been able to reproduce her results (more here and here), and her studies are so poorly written that understanding how she came to her conclusions is sometimes, at best, a guessing game.

HINOJOSA: In emails, two prominent independent scientists, on a panel that is reviewing the scientific literature for the American Psychological Association told us the studies have “inadequate or inappropriate” controls and don’t adequately control “for women’s mental health prior to the pregnancy and abortion.”

-so there’s that.

And oh lawd, don’t get me started on the Breast Cancer Prevention Institute, founded by that joke of a scientist, Joel Brind. I mean, for chrissakes, he’s an anti-choice activist and founded the institute not to study, but to prove the connection. You don’t go into research with an agenda like that. By introducing that wild amount of bias, he’s basically destroyed all possible credibility.

Nobody but anti-choice “scientists” push the abortion-breast cancer link. Not the World Health Organization, not the American Medical Association (PDF) (it’s a twofer!) not the National Cancer Institute, not the American Cancer Society, not the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and not the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

While we’re at it, here are the posts I’ve written on:

Abortion and breast cancer

Abortion and mental health

Problems with studies on abortion and mental health

At this point, I’m really just doing this for people who need resources to talk to people like you, because honestly, I know you’re going to plug your ears and go lalalalala until another dinky, shady research institute comes out with another poorly written, deeply flawed study that tells you what you want to hear.

(Source: stfueverything)

Nov 30 '11

Science!

Reblorgable upon request!

alwaysthisrestless asked: Hi there - just wanted to point out a few things. While many studies may show that there is no pattern of trauma after abortion, many other studies show that there are. (For example, please go to my URL and then type /tagged/hannahandfreckles — if all goes well and I didn’t spell anything wrong here, you’ll see a tiny bit of my own research as well as my own personal experience!)

[cont’d]:

Also (I didn’t include this in my other “question” because I ran out of room), when it comes to the abortion vs. adoption argument, my final stance is this: abortion ends a human being’s life and can cause physical and emotional trauma to a mother not caused by regular pregnancy; adoption - while it may be complicated and flawed, most every process is - allows life to continue. Lastly, I’d like to suggest you read “Gianna: Aborted, and Lived to Tell About It” by Jennifer Renshaw.

This is the page alwaysthisrestless is referring to, on AfterAbortion.org, a website run by the pro-life Elliot Institute.

Before I go on, here’s a post I wrote about the problems with studies on abortion and depression. All studies are not created equal - I wrote another post on how to evaluate them. I anticipate encountering a number of these issues as I look through the studies.

Right off the bat, there are a few studies that need to be thrown out. Studies done by researchers with a clear and stated bias are immediately suspect. For example, David Reardon is the director of the pro-life Elliot Institute and is an anti-choice advocate. Actually, he was described by the New York Times as the “Moses” of anti-choice activists. Which, uh, weird. Anyway. Not only that, but his methodology has been repeatedly criticized: He published a survey taken from members of a group called Women Exploited by Abortion which found - surprise! - high rates of nervous breakdowns, substance abuse, and suicide attempts. David Reardon failed Proper Sampling 101. He has a degree from an unaccredited correspondence school, Pacific Western University, which was shut down following a lawsuit filed by the state of Hawaii.

So, he’s out. So is the entire Elliot Institute. Bias and politics have no place in research.

E. Joanne Angelo is out, too. While her writing on hospice is valuable, she has held leadership positions in pro-life organizations, like the University Faculty for Life and Women Affirming Life. She’s also a member of the Pontifical Academy for Life. Her contribution to this page had no research on abortion behind it; instead, it generalized to the entire population the reactions of some of her clients, many of whom had mental health issues or external problems before their abortions.

There are way too many ancient studies on this page. Not a single one was done before 2000. That’s a problem. Generally, you want to stick to studies that have been done within the past 10 years, unless it’s a really good one (lots of citations, replicable results, huge population, etc.) or a classic. It seems odd that people purporting to be interested in informing people of scientific findings wouldn’t be keeping up on the latest research. Now, if I was going by that criteria alone, that would eliminate - well, all of them. But, for the sake of argument, I’ll check some out.

Carl Tishler’s case study from 1981 discusses two cases of suicide attempts following an abortion. Patient 1 had attempted suicide previously and described herself as depressed. Patient 2 had a history of self-harm, running away from home, and a family history of suicide and alcoholism, as well as troubles at home. The studies cited in this case study discussed suicide and teen pregnancy, not abortion.

Also, they cited him and Angelo twice. That’s cheating!

Esther Greenglass’ study, “Therapeutic abortion and psychiatric disturbance in Canadian women,” actually comes to the exact opposite conclusion, so I’m not entirely sure why it was included on this page. 88% of the 188 interviewed women never sought psychiatric treatment. 30% had had treatment before, and 21% of them had a psychiatric disorder after the abortion (compared to 8% of the rest of the women). From the abstract: “The author argues that abortion itself is not a primary cause of psychiatric disturbance; rather, the social and psychological context of the pregnancy and the abortion may contribute to psychiatric disorder.”

Just for funsies, I looked at Reardon and Ney’s “Abortion and Subsequent Substance Abuse” study from 2000. No citations listed on PubMed, meaning nobody else has used this study to replicate the findings or support their own study. Bad news. This also relied on self-reporting, which skews the results in all sorts of ways. The percentages of respondents who’d had abortions didn’t match the national average, either. In the end, the sample size was narrowed down to 85, with 14 respondents with a history of substance abuse having aborted their first pregnancy. Of the 6 who began using around the same time as their first pregnancy, 5 had had abortions. That is a tiny-ass sample size. And, again, this only studies correlation, not causation.

It’s awesome that you kind of did some research, but it takes a hell of a lot more than pulling some studies out of thin air to make a point. I’m not a scientist - hell, I’m not even any kind of science major, but I was able to tear down a lot of those studies fairly easily. That would not happen with valid studies. The APA did a comprehensive report on mental health and abortion, which I linked above for my post on problems with studies on abortion and depression. They looked through every empirical study on the topic since 1989 and had to throw most of them out because of severe methodological problems, like the ones I’ve talked about. I’d really recommend skimming their page on the report, and you can download the PDF there, too.

Your reasoning does not resonate with most people who’ve had abortions and adoptions. Adoption is a complex process, and the mental health of the bio parent and the success rate of adoption is heavily influenced by class, race, and family history. There is a long history of coercive adoption in this country, and it still goes on today. Adoption agencies offer financial incentives to birthmothers, targeting the poorest in our country. Bio parents are given conflicting messages: they are selfless, but they are weak, cold, and cruel to abandon their child. They have little space to grieve. They often wonder for the rest of their lives where their child is, or if they’re even still alive. And if you don’t give birth to a healthy, white baby adopted within months? Good luck ever getting them adopted. That’s the reality of adoption.

Even if adoption were a perfect system, it still would not be right to force others through pregnancy and childbirth. Nobody owes anybody their body - not for anything.

By the way, a recent study tracking 365,550 girls and women in Denmark found that childbirth is more likely to cause psychiatric problems than abortion. Here’s an article about it, and here’s the actual study. Some food for thought.

I know Gianna’s story. Do you know the stories of the girls sent away to maternity homes before Roe v. Wade? Read the book.

Your mother’s story is an inspiring one for people who want to keep their pregnancies, but you do not get to use your own unique experiences to oppress others. Just because it worked out for your mother does not mean it will work out for others, and it doesn’t mean they have to try, either. Your mother chose her path - imagine being forced down it. I wouldn’t wish that on anybody, and certainly not on my own mother. She was the thinking, feeling being with responsibilities other than to the pregnancy - I was a nonsentient parasitic being inside her. If she had gotten an abortion, I simply would not exist, just as I would not exist if my parents hadn’t had sex at that exact time, or if the contraception hadn’t failed, or if my mom had miscarried. Your existential crisis does not give you the right to take away critical choices for complete strangers.

Thanks for your message.

Nov 30 '11

releasinginhibitions asked:

Hi there - just wanted to point out a few things. While many studies may show that there is no pattern of trauma after abortion, many other studies show that there are. (For example, please go to my URL and then type /tagged/hannahandfreckles -- if all goes well and I didn't spell anything wrong here, you'll see a tiny bit of my own research as well as my own personal experience!)

[cont’d]:

Also (I didn’t include this in my other “question” because I ran out of room), when it comes to the abortion vs. adoption argument, my final stance is this: abortion ends a human being’s life and can cause physical and emotional trauma to a mother not caused by regular pregnancy; adoption - while it may be complicated and flawed, most every process is - allows life to continue. Lastly, I’d like to suggest you read “Gianna: Aborted, and Lived to Tell About It” by Jennifer Renshaw.

This is the page alwaysthisrestless is referring to, on AfterAbortion.org, a website run by the pro-life Elliot Institute.

Before I go on, here’s a post I wrote about the problems with studies on abortion and depression. All studies are not created equal - I wrote another post on how to evaluate them. I anticipate encountering a number of these issues as I look through the studies.

Right off the bat, there are a few studies that need to be thrown out. Studies done by researchers with a clear and stated bias are immediately suspect. For example, David Reardon is the director of the pro-life Elliot Institute and is an anti-choice advocate. Actually, he was described by the New York Times as the “Moses" of anti-choice activists. Which, uh, weird. Anyway. Not only that, but his methodology has been repeatedly criticized: He published a survey taken from members of a group called Women Exploited by Abortion which found - surprise! - high rates of nervous breakdowns, substance abuse, and suicide attempts. David Reardon failed Proper Sampling 101. He has a degree from an unaccredited correspondence school, Pacific Western University, which was shut down following a lawsuit filed by the state of Hawaii.

So, he’s out. So is the entire Elliot Institute. Bias and politics have no place in research.

E. Joanne Angelo is out, too. While her writing on hospice is valuable, she has held leadership positions in pro-life organizations, like the University Faculty for Life and Women Affirming Life. She’s also a member of the Pontifical Academy for Life. Her contribution to this page had no research on abortion behind it; instead, it generalized to the entire population the reactions of some of her clients, many of whom had mental health issues or external problems before their abortions.

There are way too many ancient studies on this page. Not a single one was done before 2000. That’s a problem. Generally, you want to stick to studies that have been done within the past 10 years, unless it’s a really good one (lots of citations, replicable results, huge population, etc.) or a classic. It seems odd that people purporting to be interested in informing people of scientific findings wouldn’t be keeping up on the latest research. Now, if I was going by that criteria alone, that would eliminate - well, all of them. But, for the sake of argument, I’ll check some out.

Carl Tishler’s case study from 1981 discusses two cases of suicide attempts following an abortion. Patient 1 had attempted suicide previously and described herself as depressed. Patient 2 had a history of self-harm, running away from home, and a family history of suicide and alcoholism, as well as troubles at home. The studies cited in this case study discussed suicide and teen pregnancy, not abortion.

Also, they cited him and Angelo twice. That’s cheating!

Esther Greenglass’ study, “Therapeutic abortion and psychiatric disturbance in Canadian women,” actually comes to the exact opposite conclusion, so I’m not entirely sure why it was included on this page. 88% of the 188 interviewed women never sought psychiatric treatment. 30% had had treatment before, and 21% of them had a psychiatric disorder after the abortion (compared to 8% of the rest of the women). From the abstract: “The author argues that abortion itself is not a primary cause of psychiatric disturbance; rather, the social and psychological context of the pregnancy and the abortion may contribute to psychiatric disorder.”

Just for funsies, I looked at Reardon and Ney’s “Abortion and Subsequent Substance Abuse” study from 2000. No citations listed on PubMed, meaning nobody else has used this study to replicate the findings or support their own study. Bad news. This also replied on self-reporting, which skews the results in all sorts of ways. The percentages of respondents who’d had abortions didn’t match the national average, either. In the end, the sample size was narrowed down to 85, with 14 respondents with a history of substance abuse having aborted their first pregnancy. Of the 6 who began using around the same time as their first pregnancy, 5 had had abortions. That is a tiny-ass sample size. And, again, this only studies correlation, not causation.

It’s awesome that you kind of did some research, but it takes a hell of a lot more than pulling some studies out of thin air to make a point. I’m not a scientist - hell, I’m not even any kind of science major, but I was able to tear down a lot of those studies fairly easily. That would not happen with valid studies. The APA did a comprehensive report on mental health and abortion, which I linked above for my post on problems with studies on abortion and depression. They looked through every empirical study on the topic since 1989 and had to throw most of them out because of severe methodological problems, like the ones I’ve talked about. I’d really recommend skimming their page on the report, and you can download the PDF there, too.

Your reasoning does not resonate with most people who’ve had abortions and adoptions. Adoption is a complex process, and the mental health of the bio parent and the success rate of adoption is heavily influenced by class, race, and family history. There is a long history of coercive adoption in this country, and it still goes on today. Adoption agencies offer financial incentives to birthmothers, targeting the poorest in our country. Bio parents are given conflicting messages: they are selfless, but they are weak, cold, and cruel to abandon their child. They have little space to grieve. They often wonder for the rest of their lives where their child is, or if they’re even still alive. And if you don’t give birth to a healthy, white baby adopted within months? Good luck ever getting them adopted. That’s the reality of adoption.

Even if adoption were a perfect system, it still would not be right to force others through pregnancy and childbirth. Nobody owes anybody their body - not for anything.

By the way, a recent study tracking 365,550 girls and women in Denmark found that childbirth is more likely to cause psychiatric problems than abortion. Here’s an article about it, and here’s the actual study. Some food for thought.

I know Gianna’s story. Do you know the stories of the girls sent away to maternity homes before Roe v. Wade? Read the book.

Your mother’s story is an inspiring one for people who want to keep their pregnancies, but you do not get to use your own unique experiences to oppress others. Just because it worked out for your mother does not mean it will work out for others, and it doesn’t mean they have to try, either. Your mother chose her path - imagine being forced down it. I wouldn’t wish that on anybody, and certainly not on my own mother. She was the thinking, feeling being with responsibilities other than to the pregnancy - I was a nonsentient parasitic being inside her. If she had gotten an abortion, I simply would not exist, just as I would not exist if my parents hadn’t had sex at that exact time, or if the contraception hadn’t failed, or if my mom had miscarried. Your existential crisis does not give you the right to take away critical choices for complete strangers.

Thanks for your message.