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Pro-Choice and Pro-Voice

Posts tagged race

Mar 28 '14
Mar 26 '14

astrochelonian:

bebinn:

Imani Gandy (@AngryBlackLady) gave a speech at this year’s Abortion Care Network conference. She spoke on many important issues, including how Black women’s reproductive lives are portrayed by the media, the place of Black women and women of color in the movement, and the difference between pro-choice/reproductive rights and reproductive justice.

I had to restrain myself from screencapping the whole Storify, so click through and read the whole thing!

Read the Storify link.

Reproductive justice means supporting mothers of colour whose children are abducted to be sold into the adoption industry in the First World or taken away by First World governments on some racist pretext or the other. It means fighting against forced sterilisation and contraception as much as it does fighting for access to abortion. It means fighting against the dehumanising industry of surrogacy where Third World women’s wombs are commodified. It means recognising that forced and coerced abortions happen - and that this is taking away a woman’s CHOICE - and opposing them rather than painting all abortions as “choice”. It means supporting mothers who choose to have children and who choose to take care of them rather than work. It means all of this in ADDITION to fighting for access to safe and legal abortion that as exercised by the pregnant person’s choice.

Honestly in the entire prochoice community I’ve come across on the internet, I haven’t seen anyone so much as mention these issues. How much of this is due to white Western feminism? I’d guess a lot.

Mar 23 '14

Imani Gandy (@AngryBlackLady) gave a speech at this year’s Abortion Care Network conference. She spoke on many important issues, including how Black women’s reproductive lives are portrayed by the media, the place of Black women and women of color in the movement, and the difference between pro-choice/reproductive rights and reproductive justice.

I had to restrain myself from screencapping the whole Storify, so click through and read the whole thing!

Mar 6 '14

rhrealitycheck:

While I appreciate the responses, a blog post and a two-year-old press release is insufficient to address the very real threat of disenfranchisement facing women of color across the country.

Maybe I shouldn’t complain. Maybe I should be happy that Black women are viewed as a reliable voting bloc who will, by and large, vote for more choice and more justice.

But taking our votes for granted is not conducive to movement-building. And I can’t help but feel disheartened at the expectation that we will continue to deliver reproductive rights victories that are then recast as victories for “women voters.” The bottom line is this: It’s not “women” who are getting it done. It’s Black women voters.

A little recognition for that fact would be nice. 

– Imani Gandy, Black Women Are An Electoral Voting Force. Recognize.

Mar 4 '14
SisterSong Women of Color for Reproductive Justice Collective was formed to amplify the voices of Indigenous women and women of color to ensure reproductive justice. SisterSong is made up of 80 local, regional, and national organizations that work to educate and empower women of color to represent themselves and their communities.
SisterSong will host reproductive justice trainings for your organization to help you more effectively and inclusively advocate for change. They also host conferences, implement media campaigns, conduct research, advocate politically, and work to strengthen other reproductive justice organizations.
If you want to get involved on the ground with SisterSong, take some time to explore their website, and check out their Member Organizations to find a group near you.

SisterSong Women of Color for Reproductive Justice Collective was formed to amplify the voices of Indigenous women and women of color to ensure reproductive justice. SisterSong is made up of 80 local, regional, and national organizations that work to educate and empower women of color to represent themselves and their communities.

SisterSong will host reproductive justice trainings for your organization to help you more effectively and inclusively advocate for change. They also host conferences, implement media campaigns, conduct research, advocate politically, and work to strengthen other reproductive justice organizations.

If you want to get involved on the ground with SisterSong, take some time to explore their website, and check out their Member Organizations to find a group near you.

Mar 2 '14
Feb 27 '14
"[TW: Rape] According to statistics from the United States Department of Justice, for every white woman who reports a rape, there are at least five black women who are raped but do not report it. For every black woman who reports her rape, at least 15 black women’s sexual assaults go unreported."
Feb 27 '14

To label family planning and legal abortion programs “genocide” is male rhetoric, for male ears. It falls flat to female listeners and to thoughtful male ones. Women know, and so do many men, that two or three children who are wanted, prepared for, reared amid love and stability, and educated to the limit of their ability will mean more for the future of the Black and brown races from which they come than any number of neglected, hungry, ill-housed and ill-clothed youngsters.

Loretta Ross is one of the founding members and former National Coordinator for SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective.
[h/t Abortion Care Network]

To label family planning and legal abortion programs “genocide” is male rhetoric, for male ears. It falls flat to female listeners and to thoughtful male ones. Women know, and so do many men, that two or three children who are wanted, prepared for, reared amid love and stability, and educated to the limit of their ability will mean more for the future of the Black and brown races from which they come than any number of neglected, hungry, ill-housed and ill-clothed youngsters.

Loretta Ross is one of the founding members and former National Coordinator for SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective.

[h/t Abortion Care Network]

Feb 26 '14
Feb 25 '14

I wrote “our white activists” as opposed to “white activists” when talking about the reproductive rights movement because we need to have more accountability as to whose voices we are broadcasting, and whose we are ignoring, silencing, or using without due credit. Every person, myself included, is complicit in upholding the status quo of valuing white voices over black or other POC voices, even as we work to dismantle other parts of the patriarchy.

Feb 25 '14
"As black feminists from the ’70s onward sought to expand racial, gender and economic equality for women of color, they found themselves being left out of mainstream conversations about equal pay and reproductive rights. Their stories were left untold in a women’s rights movement, led by mainly white women. Tired of being silenced and fueled by an international movement for human rights, they began the reproductive justice movement to bring to light the fact that communities of color lack access to basic healthcare and pregnancy options, including the opportunity to raise our children with dignity. They demanded that our stories be heard, and their demands still affect how we think about policy today."

Whitewashing reproductive rights: How black activists get erased

Never forget, it was black women who developed “reproductive justice" and a black woman who coined "intersectionality.” Black women have long been at the forefront of civil rights and social justice movements, yet it’s our white activists who get the spotlight.

Feb 12 '14

queennubian:

tw:Rape

black-culture:

We must protect and save our children(@zellieimani)

I cannot tell you how many men have told me that they were raped or molested at some point in their life by another man (and or women). There are so many of them. And it’s heart breaking. And the one thing they all say is that they never told people they love because they didn’t want any of the negative attention, including being called gay or a sexual deviant. . 

Feb 4 '14
Jan 11 '14

sleepyvalenighthollow:

I AM the ‘bad bisexual’.

I AM the ‘sexually agressive slut’.

I AM the ‘Swinging, poly, non-monogamous whore’

I AM NOT the reason for biphobia

I AM NOT who you shove under the carpet while you desperately beg for monosexual approval

I AM still valid

I AM still worthy of respect and care

I AM a person

Respectability politics hurt people. Stop it.

"Respectability politics" originated as a term used by and for people of color, specifically Black people (credit goes to Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, a Black feminist scholar, in 1994). Correct me if I’m wrong, but considering the history of appropriation of Black-specific terms for other issues (along with calling things “the next civil rights movement” like racism is over or something), I don’t know if it’s appropriate to use it in reference to sexuality outside the context of race and without crediting/including Black people. That’s not to say this post isn’t completely accurate (it is), but that the term may not be in the correct context.

I don’t assume anything about OP’s race, and will delete this if I’m totally off base.

(Source: bisexualpiratequeen)

Jan 7 '14
"Eve Ensler, I really want to be with you here. I am over years and years of talking about and being exhausted by rape too. But I gotta say: 1) there is no such thing as a global sisterhood of assault survivors. Things like colonialism and internalized oppression (racism, sexism, transphobia, homophobia, etc) make it impossible for people to connect, relate, and ally one another. 2) Sexual assault is a gendered crime, but women are not the only survivors. Focusing only on female survivors erases the experiences of trans and gender non conforming and male survivors of violence. 3) Rape is not the same across the world. I’m not sure you can compare rape as a tactic of war and rape in every developing country to the Herman Cain or Penn State scandals. That diminishes the nuanced ways different histories, cultures, policies, economies, etc construct varying forms of rape cultures. Let’s speak for ourselves and our communities, not for all women of the world. Let’s interrogate oppression without alienating those who don’t identify as women. Let’s work to end rape culture by understanding how every individual, ourselves included, participates in these cultures as well."

My sister (!) responding to this Eve Ensler piece.  (via iamdrtiller)

^^^THIS. I have so much beef with Eve Ensler and her white appropriation bullshittery. ~MsQ

(via msqueenly)

2014: The year to stop Eve Ensler

(via chiefelk)

(Source: stephherold)