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Pro-Choice and Pro-Voice

Posts tagged violence

Mar 28 '14
"[Kitty] Genovese’s murder is a parable in which the absent cops are the heroes and her neighbors eclipse even her killer in their culpability for the crime…But Genovese herself lived in fear of police persecution, both at work and in her personal life. At least one witness to the crime, a friend of Kitty’s, also had good reason to be wary of law enforcement. And once the cops did engage with the case, they failed spectacularly to provide the kind of assistance the legend assumes they stood poised to offer that night. The Genovese story isn’t just a story of individual moral culpability, it’s also a story about malign and corrupt institutions and the corrosive effects those institutions have on our lives."

Don’t Look Now

Kitty Genovese’s murder is often cited as an example of the “bystander effect,” or her community’s failure to call the police during the attack. What you don’t often hear is that Genovese was a lesbian in a time when homosexuality was illegal in New York City. Only two of the 38 accused “apathetic bystanders” actually witnessed the attack, and one of them was gay as well (and alcoholic).

So was Genovese’s case really about the bystander effect?

Nov 8 '13
"

When we start to look more deeply into what the statistics reveal about murder, we discover some striking patterns in the data, some of which are quite surprising. One of the most salient observations that emerges is that murder is a male-dominated phenomenon. Year after year, the percentage of murders in the U.S that are committed by men hovers right around 87. It may be surprising that men are also much more often the victims of murder. Of murder victims in any given year, on average, 75 percent are men – a percentage that has remained quite stable over the years, with 74 percent in 1964, 77 percent in 1974, and 75 percent in 1984. It’s also interesting to look at how many murders by men are perpetrated against men. On average, 65 percent of all murders involve males killing males. By comparison, 22 percent of murders involve males killing females. As for murders by women, 10 percent of all murders, on average, involve females killing males, and a mere 3 percent of murders involve females killing other females.

If we look at the complete set of same-sex killings – male killing male and female killing female – we find that more than 95 percent involve men killing other men. These patterns show a remarkable consistency across cultures. In statistics compiled from thirty-five different studies representing a broad span of cultures, the vast majority of same-sex killings were committed by men: 97 percent in Brazil, 93 percent in Scotland, 94 percent in Kenya, 98 percent in Uganda, and 97 percent among the people known as the Tiv in Nigeria.

"

Buss, David. "The Murderer Next Door: Why The Mind Is Designed To Kill." Penguin Press; New York, 2005. (p. 22)

What MRAs and anti-feminists fail to realize when they mention how men are more likely to be murdered than women is that they are not actually rebutting feminist arguments addressing the prevalence of male violence. The question feminist theory provides answers to is not whether or not men can be victims, but why is it that the majority of the time the gender of the people perpetuating violent sexual or homicidal acts are men. From there, theories on the social structuring of society (making mention of gender-based power dynamics) and sex-specific socialization, all in relation to a society structured to uphold male dominance (i.e.: patriarchy) are applied. While male victimization is an issue, it is not the core issue that feminist theorists address, which is how do we socialize men to be less violent so that the rates of violence in general go down.

(via gynocraticgrrl)

So if anyone tries to rebut the concept of rape culture with “murder culture”…yeah, it’s still a male problem.

Mar 29 '13
"Welcome to the pre-release version of the Creative Interventions Toolkit: A Practical Guide to Stop Interpersonal Violence. While we are waiting for the finalizing of the designed version of this Toolkit, we wanted to make the contents of the Toolkit available for the public. These pdf versions are being made available for your use. Because the pdfs were not meant as a final version, some of the formatting is awkward. We hope to have the designed version available by the end of Summer 2012. Due to the length of the full Toolkit, we have the pre-release version available as a complete document, or you can download the Toolkit in sections."

Toolkit | Creative Interventions

gonna take a look at this later!

(via iinventedeverything)

Mar 19 '13
"I do feel sorry for these boys. And not only because they will be put in cages that will not make them any better. I also feel sorry that two 16-year-olds are capable of the things these boys have been found guilty of doing. That makes me deeply, deeply sad. ​That we have created a world in which, at just 16 years old, and even younger, boys can already hate girls this much. That they can already dehumanize and degrade them. That misogyny is so insidious and so effective as to make 16-year-old boys incapable of respecting this girl, of seeing her as a human being with the right to make her own choices, even when drunk, and the right to remain unviolated, even when passed out. I am sorry for these boys that, at 16, some of their humanity is already gone. The cruelty of kids is not new, and I guess it should not shock me, but this specifically gendered cruelty, at such extreme levels and at such a young age, is shocking to me. And I do feel very sorry for these boys.

Just not as sorry as I feel for the girl they raped."

Mia McKenzie, On Rape, Cages, and the Steubenville Verdict (via sugaryumyum)

I’m sorry that, when they go home, they will be coddled and comforted and cooed over by people who will reinforce the notion that they did nothing wrong. They will learn nothing, and they will do it again.

It’s irresistible to call for their permanent incarceration. Viciously, I would be happy if they never saw the light of day again. But that solves nothing - it doesn’t teach them or any other young men that young girls and women are human beings deserving of respect and humanity. It doesn’t lessen this brave girl’s trauma, or make her community realize what monsters they’ve been and rally to support her.

There have to be alternatives to imprisoning people, I just don’t know what they are. I’m going to be scouring McKenzie’s Resources page for more insight.

Dec 27 '11
ohmyloria:

antivian:

bebinn:

craftychristianmamma:

Don’t punish the child for the horrific acts of the father.

Don’t revictimize the survivor by forcing them to let their body be used against their will for months on end. You have no fucking idea what that’s like.

^This

Not going to comment on the issue because its clearly a touchy subject. Granted it is not the child’s fault, the mother is the one with control. It is always the mother’s choice. Life is unfair and cruel, and choosing whether to keep or give up a baby isn’t fair either. But what child wants to grow up knowing he or she is a product of rape? I don’t know, I think its no one’s business but the mothers.

It’s not the fetus’ fault it exists like it’s not the bullet’s fault it’s lodged in your stomach, like it’s not the knife’s fault it’s buried in your chest, like it’s not the rope’s fault it’s wrapped around your throat. You can’t blame those things for the harm they’re doing you, but that doesn’t mean you don’t get to remove them from your body.

ohmyloria:

antivian:

bebinn:

craftychristianmamma:

Don’t punish the child for the horrific acts of the father.

Don’t revictimize the survivor by forcing them to let their body be used against their will for months on end. You have no fucking idea what that’s like.

^This

Not going to comment on the issue because its clearly a touchy subject. Granted it is not the child’s fault, the mother is the one with control. It is always the mother’s choice. Life is unfair and cruel, and choosing whether to keep or give up a baby isn’t fair either. But what child wants to grow up knowing he or she is a product of rape? I don’t know, I think its no one’s business but the mothers.

It’s not the fetus’ fault it exists like it’s not the bullet’s fault it’s lodged in your stomach, like it’s not the knife’s fault it’s buried in your chest, like it’s not the rope’s fault it’s wrapped around your throat. You can’t blame those things for the harm they’re doing you, but that doesn’t mean you don’t get to remove them from your body.

(Source: reflections-of-shadows)

Sep 18 '11

Need help? Here are some links for you

fuckyeahsexeducation:

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network, America’s largest anti-sexual violence network. Website includes a Sexual Assault phone and online hotline, find a local counseling center,  how to help a loved one, information to educate yourself and a list of international resources

1-800-656-HOPE

http://www.rainn.org/

Gay Men’s Domestic Violence Project, provides crisis intervention, support and resources to victims and survivors of domestic abuse. Includes a hotline and a list of events

1-800-832-1901

http://gmdvp.org/

Help Guide, find any kind of helpful organization including domestic abuse. Includes a help guide, hotlines, and where to find a safe place to stay.

http://www.helpguide.org/mental/domestic_violence_abuse_help_treatment_prevention.htm

Kids Help, an organization that focuses on helping children and teens in Canada. Includes a phone and online hotline, helps set kids and teens up with a resource in their area.

1800-668-6868

http://org.kidshelpphone.ca/en

Youth Homelessness and Runaway Prevention, to help keep runaway and at risk children off the streets and safe. Provides support and solutions to keep kids safe.

1-800-Runaway

http://www.1800runaway.org/

The National Herpes Hotline provides information and referrals to help treat and live with herpes.

(919) 361-8488

http://www.herpesonline.org/articles/herpes_hotline.html

A list of National hotlines for STDS and/or substance abuse

http://www.stopthinkbesafe.org/youngpeople/hotline.asp

Hopeline, run by the Kristin Brooks Hope Center, A hotline that helps you deal with feelings of depression or the thought of suicide. Amazing organization to give you hope.

1-800-442-HOPE

http://www.hopeline.com/gethelpnow.html

Aug 11 '11
May 31 '11